The river of sticks and scared fish

It is the nature of exploration that not every adventure will be the best adventure. Last weekend we drove out to the West Fork of the Duchesne River. We’d heard rumors that this was a worthy river and fishing great, and just our style. It’s a longish drive on pavement and the dirt road is rough, but we figured it was day-trippable from the city. For the first few miles we drove on a forest service road that goes through

Riding near Stanley, ID

Secret Spots

We all know the joy in finding a new, amazing place to ride/camp/fish, especially if that place is one that you discovered on your own, that is only marginally mentioned on the internet, that the shop guys don’t have the info on, that isn’t on any app. My first instinct is to tell all my favorite friends about this most awesome place we found!! Because, really, when you are bursting with excitement, it is natural to want to share. Recently

Fishing and Floating the John Day River

I’ve never had any interest in fly fishing for carp, but when you float down a slow, lazy river in the baking heat on a stand up paddle board for a few days, the idea starts to seem like a good one. They swim in the murkiest, calmest, warmest pockets of water on the John Day, cruising below my SUP with the confidence of small sharks. We were fishing for small-mouthed bass. I was fishing poppers, the most adorable fishing

catching not landing

It’s all about the the process, right?

I am a huge fan of change and of learning new things. The consequence of this is that I am not very good at all of the things. There is so much research and buzz about doing something over and over and over and over and over to master, to perfect, to become excellent. And while I am also a huge fan of excellence, I rarely achieve it. But it doesn’t matter! As long as the process is fun and

Why Fish, Part 1*

I have been fly fishing for just about 2 years, and within this particularly passionate world that means I am basically a beginner. Fortunately, I feel like a beginner, even in terms of understanding why I like to fish at all. Fishing is not an obviously fun thing to do: standing in a cold river, wearing practical but incredibly unflattering clothing, threading tiny pieces of nylon through tiny holes, tying lots of knots, rescuing snagged lines… Not to mention the

Rollie Pollie Frog Popper

Poppers!

When I decided to take up fly fishing I knew, with no exaggeration, almost nothing about it. No one who knows me will be surprised to learn that I started with the gear: rod lengths, weights and flex, reels, lines, nets, flies, packs… I learned the knots, I learned about hatches, and creeks vs rivers, dry flies vs wet flies vs nymphs. Strangely, I never really thought about the fish. I assumed that fly fishing = trout fishing (and hey!

What About Wyoming?

What do you think of when you think about Wyoming? Yellowstone, the Tetons, Jackson Hole, maybe the Wind Rivers? All of those exist in the western half of the state. I don’t know for sure, but I imagine the eastern side of Wyoming is nothing but a flat, icy blast of desolation. But what about the rest of that western half? Mountain biking (and camping) on Teton Pass is huge amounts of fun. The Tetons, Yellowstone and Wind Rivers are

Spooky, Stingy and Educated

Fishing, like a lot of activities, has a certain amount of ritual involved. Sure, you could just go fishing… but wouldn’t it be better to stop at the fly shop and have a word with the fellas? Tell ’em where you’re headed, see what’s fishing well, find out what flies the fish are going for… Part of me always wonders if this is an opportunity to sell off some extra fly inventory, but I do enjoy saying hello to the guys (when

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